Archive for the ‘Research’ Category.

Exploring Women’s Entrepreneurship in India

As part of a multi-country study undertaken by the United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP), Ms. Hina Shah in India is conducting a national study on “Creating an Enabling Environment for Women’s Economic Empowerment through Entrepreneurship.”  Although India has recently been labeled as one of the best places for women entrepreneurs to start a business, women entrepreneurs only make up about 10% of total SMEs.

To explore the reasons behind this slow growth of women’s entrepreneurship and contribute to the ESCAP study, Ms. Shah is disseminating a survey for women entrepreneurs in India.  The research tool is designed to profile women entrepreneurs in India and the constraints they face.  The results will feed into the Indian component of the UN study and also help shape policy recommendations aimed at creating a more enabling environment for women’s entrepreneurship in India.

If you are a female entrepreneur in India, please take a few moments to complete the survey by clicking here.  The completed form should be sent to Ms. Hina Shah at icecdindia@gmail.com. Your response is now requested by November 29.

Women Owned Businesses in Jamaica

Yaneek Page is president of the Women Business Owners (WBO) association in Jamaica.  WBO was founded in 2003 to foster and promote the success of women business owners through education, research, mentorship and education.

In 2005-2006 Women Business Owners (WBO) Jamaica completed a study of women and family owned business in Jamaica (the survey counted 2,916 family-owned businesses (FOBs) and 1,718 owned by women (WOBs)). The study was done in partnership with the Jamaica Conference Board, the Bank of Nova Scotia Jamaica Ltd., the United States Agency for International Development and Mona School of Business at the University of the West Indies. The themes covered in the study included the business characteristics, business leadership, business relationships, succession and resource planning, and governance and citizenship. The key findings from the study were:

  •  There were 315 operations categorised as both FOBs and WOBs, largely based on the uncertainty of respondents attached to those businesses.
  • The highest number of FWOBs, approximately 1,512, was recorded in the Kingston and St. Andrew metropolitan area, skewed 60 per cent to FOBs; followed by St. Catherine with 1,308; and St. Ann with 449.

Building on this report, WBO has recently launched a program with Scotiabank Jamaica and the Inter-American Development Bank to support businesswomen who seek to grow their enterprises.  Under the new endeavor, Scotiabank has set aside J$300 million for members of WBO who need working capital, re-tooling of processes, upgraded technology, and other investments needed for growth.

The executive summary which is reproduced here, details in point form the main findings of the study: Continue reading ‘Women Owned Businesses in Jamaica’ »

Global Entrepreneurship Monitor’s 2010 Women’s Report

In 2010, Global Entrepreneurship Monitor (GEM) conducted a study of women entrepreneurs around the world. With the goal of promoting the value women entrepreneurs can bring to their environments, GEM addressed topics including women’s attitudes, activities, and aspirations as entrepreneurs.

Among the 2010 Women’s Report’s findings is that compared to men, “fewer women believe there are lots of opportunities for entrepreneurship and that they have the capabilities for this endeavor.” This leads to fewer women having the intention of starting a business due to a fear of failure. This attitude is pronounced in more developed economies, while in less developed economies women are more likely to start a business out of necessity. At all levels of economic development, women tend to have lower growth expectations than men.

Around the world, women’s participation in entrepreneurship varies widely from 1.5% of adult working-age women to as high as 45.4%. Regionally, Sub-Saharan Africa boasts the highest proportions of female entrepreneurs with women making up close to or more than half of entrepreneurs (Ghana held the highest rate at 55%). Conversely, among Middle East and North African economies none reported a rate higher than one-third. Women in Sub-Saharan countries also generally exhibit higher perceptions of capabilities and opportunities with Uganda, Zambia, and Ghana leading the factor-driven grouping. In the efficiency-driven economies, Latin American countries such as Ecuador and Peru had the highest rankings while Russia, Malaysia, and Romania exhibited markedly lower numbers.

Continue reading ‘Global Entrepreneurship Monitor’s 2010 Women’s Report’ »

World Bank Study Finds That Legal Differences Based on Gender Continue to Limit Women’s Participation in the Formal Economy

Women represent 49.6% of the population worldwide, but only 40.8% of the formal economy. A recent World Bank study, Women, Business and the Law 2012: Removing Barriers to Economic Inclusion, contends that this disparity may be explained in part by the legal differences between men and women present in many countries. Building off of and expanding beyond other business indicator datasets, like Doing Business and the Enterprise Surveys, the Women, Business and the Law project (WBL) sought to identify and shed light on the additional legal barriers women face when seeking employment or starting their own business. The project studied 141 economies across the globe, measuring the legal differences based on gender in six areas: accessing institutions, using property, getting a job, providing incentives to work, building credit, and going to court.
Continue reading ‘World Bank Study Finds That Legal Differences Based on Gender Continue to Limit Women’s Participation in the Formal Economy’ »

MENA Women Entrepreneurs Interviews

Dear colleagues,

Greetings! Earlier in the summer, Asma Uddin and Sheeba Arif invited you to take part in a unique and exciting project. Now that Ramadan is over, we would like to set up Skype interviews to move forward in our collaboration with the University of Pennsylvania’s renowned Wharton School of Business working on a series of articles and a book on female entrepreneurship in the MENA region. This project offers you—relevant female entrepreneurs—the opportunity to share your experiences through two different outlets: (1) a series of articles that will be published in Wharton’s online journal, Knowledge @ Wharton (KW); and (2) a book that will result from a compilation of stories featured at KW.
Continue reading ‘MENA Women Entrepreneurs Interviews’ »

New Project: Women Entrepreneurs in MENA

Dear Colleagues,

We are writing to invite you to take part in a unique and exciting project. In collaboration with the University of Pennsylvania’s renowned Wharton School of Business, we are working on a series of articles and a book on female entrepreneurship in the MENA region. This project offers you—relevant female entrepreneurs—the opportunity to share your experiences through two different outlets: (1) a series of articles that will be published in Wharton’s online journal, Knowledge @ Wharton (KW); and (2) a book that will result from a compilation of stories featured at KW.

Continue reading ‘New Project: Women Entrepreneurs in MENA’ »

Number of Women in Senior Management Positions Decreased from 2009

According to a recent study published by Grant Thornton International, the percentage of women in senior management positions globally has dropped to levels present in 2004. The 2011 Grant Thornton International Business Report (IBR) shows a decrease in the number of women in senior management positions from 24% in 2009 to 20% in 2011, which is only up 1% from 2004. The report also found that the number of publicly held businesses with no women in senior management has increased from 35% in 2009 to 38% in 2011.

Continue reading ‘Number of Women in Senior Management Positions Decreased from 2009’ »

Call for Papers on Women’s Entrepreneurship for Women’s Journal

I have a few publications on hand right now and I hope to get connected with some researchers/academicians who wish to make a contribution towards any one of my journals at this point of time.

We have a few hard-bound publications for which we are now accepting papers for consideration. Two of the journals are women’s journals. One has a theme for its 3rd edition on women entrepreneurship in the NAM countries (as this journal is produced for the Women of NAM and it is called NIEW Journal – The Voice of the NAM Women). The other women’s journal is called Her Voice focusing on women gender studies, women’s empowerment issues, women’s health issues, policies and legislation, culture and not discounting women in business and employment as well.

Continue reading ‘Call for Papers on Women’s Entrepreneurship for Women’s Journal’ »

How to Measure Women’s Economic Empowerment?

The Governance and Social Development Resource Centre (GSDRC) recently issued a report on methods for measuring the impact of women’s economic empowerment programs. The report did not find a single definition of women’s economic empowerment in the literature, and found varying methods for measuring program impact. In particular, GSDRC found that measures of program impact generally focus on increased access to credit or increased revenue. The report goes on to highlight several attempts to create frameworks for evaluating women’s economic empowerment programs.

One such initative highlighted by GSDRC was organized by the International Center for Research on Women. The results based initiative seeks to, among other things, strengthen women entrepreneurship and increase market access using a two step approach. ICRW intends to implement programs that can later be scaled up to reach broader groups, followed by impact evaluations in search of lessons learned for use in future programs. Continue reading ‘How to Measure Women’s Economic Empowerment?’ »

Female Entrepreneurship in Developing Countries

The United Nations University has published a nice summary of what we know about women’s entrepreneurship in developing countries. Here are a few interesting facts from that publication:

  • Rates of women’s entrepreneurship are higher in developing countries than in developed countries. Why? Most likely out of necessity–it is more difficult for women to jobs in the formal labor market.
  • The gender gap in entrepreneurship is narrower in low-income countries than in middle-income countries. Again, probably out of necessity. Women in low-income countries are less afraid of failure.
  • Married women are more likely to become entrepreneurs than are non-married women.
  • Women-owned businesses tend to grow more slowly than men-owned businesses.

Continue reading ‘Female Entrepreneurship in Developing Countries’ »